Dace

Laurel Dace (Chrosomus saylori)

Historically known from only eight streams on the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee, this federally endangered species has recently faced dramatic range reduction from poor agricultural practices. Like other members of the Redbelly Dace group, male Laurel Dace develop bright breeding colors in the early spring with yellow fins and red bellies.

Blackside Dace (Chrosomus cumberlandensis)

Blackside Dace are a federally threatened species found in the upper Cumberland River Drainage above Cumberland Falls. Coal-mining activities in this area have caused population declines. Like other members of the Redbelly Dace group, male Blackside Dace develop bright breeding colors in the early spring with yellow fins, red bellies, and a golden back.

Tennessee Dace (Chrosomus tennesseensis)

Almost exclusively distributed in the upper Tennessee River Drainage in Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, and Virginia, this beautiful fish can be relatively common in the small streams where they occur. Tennessee Dace are one of many fishes that often spawn over nests constructed by the River Chub, Nocomis micropogon, an interesting form of commensalism found in southeastern stream communities. Like other members of the Redbelly Dace group, male Tennessee Dace develop bright breeding colors in the early spring with yellow fins and red bellies.

Smoky Dace (Clinostomus sp. cf. funduloides)

The Smoky Dace is endemic to the upper Little Tennessee River System and perhaps the upper Hiwassee River System. This undescribed species has more darkly pigmented sides and a blunter snout compared to the Rosyside Dace, Clinostomus funduloides.